ABOUT

Richard Holland, brings his production designer skills to his artistic vision in his growing body of dimensional fine artwork. His unique and highly original style reflects a montage of storytelling that brings together his experiences, influences and skilled techniques. The artwork is visually beautiful, yet layered with a dark underlying psyche.His ornately carved picture frames and graphic images portray life as scripted worlds, encapsulated in time. The world is a magnificent stage where pathways cross and realities unfold before our very eyes; a world captured within and outside the box.

 

Richard achieves a keen physical layering in his works that contributes to the rich layers of storytelling as expected from a Hollywood production designer’s skillset.  Each work is infused with layers of History as much as his own personal history in entertainment.The hand-carved picture frames are an integral part of the storytelling and relate to picture frames as storytelling throughout art history. Artists such as Rowlandson,Cruickshank and Gilray. to American Folk Art,Fairground Art to Modern artists like Mark Ryden and Michael Charles Ray have all got their influences.

 

The artworks use perspective, computer compositing and skill-based production design techniques like draftsmanship, drawing, and painting learned in the European tradition of apprenticeship training when Richard started in the film industry. The work begins with freehand drawing and utilizes layers of techniques. The cut outs in the work derive from the use of perspective used in films Richard worked on like Indiana Jones, Labyrinth and Roger Rabbit. The colors used in the artworks are a purposeful muted palette that telegraphs the American images from the past in the work. Influences from Past entertainment such as the Circus and Fairgrounds are ever present mixed with his love for Americana.The layering effects in each work tell the deeper story of it all. The curtain opens and the stage is set.

 

Holland’s work draws upon his continuous film-designing years, working with some of the most successful directors, producers and talent of our time—Ray Harryhausen,Franco Zeffirelli, Michael Bay, Michael Mann, Michael Cimino, Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy, Jim Henson, George Lucas, Peter Hyams, Joel Schumacher, Robert Zemeckis, Richard Lester, Lyndsay Anderson, George Harrison and the great futurist, Syd Mead—on some of the most dynamic and memorablefilms of this and past generations—Last of the Mohicans, Princess Bride, Roger Rabbit,Batman, James Bond, Labyrinth, Indiana Jones, Superman and Dark Crystal, The Pilot CSI which launched the most successful TV Franchise ever to the newly revived and beloved Alvin and the Chipmunks  franchise.

 

He also has Designed the World’s largest Slot Machine, Slotzilla,for downtown Las Vegas & theme park attractions.

Designed a Medieval Shopping complex for the City of Antwerp, a time traveling experience for Sterling CastleScotland and aBelow the Ocean Museum for Dubai.

This expansive and rich entertainment industry experience informs and enriches Holland’s personal artistic path.  Known for his work creating some of the most visually dynamic and iconic films of this generation, it is his fine artwork that completes his personal narrative.   

 

 

 

Academic Consultant for SCADS 5 year Curriculum review on Production Design.

Lecturer at Art Center Pasadena, Montana University, Hollywood Institute of the Arts, Otis College of Art and Design. 

Judge at AFI for the film and animation students’ final exhibition. 

Produced a short animated film, Mila, at the Hollywood Institute of the Arts. Project involved teaching local students in the classroom and across a secured FTP platform international from Russia to Australia.. 

Judge for the Cable Ace and TV Awards. 

Selected by the Art Directors Guild as a panelist of six Designers for a seminar on the Strategies and Function for the Art Department of Today and Tomorrow. 

Consultant with the formation of a company called Eevolver that offers a revolutionary new approach to the artdepartment and VFX production process.

 

Organizations: 

• Member, ADG: Art Directors Guild of America IATSE Local 800 

• Member, TAG: The American Animation Guild Local 843 

Founding Member, BAFTA: The British Film Designers Guild

 

Oct 2016 Apero Gallery Exhibited at an Exhibition of paintings on America.

Oct 2016 International Special Merit Award from Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery forthe Painting Cut-Outs at OK Corral.

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About

As early as I can remember I have always been an artist. Always top in Art at school,I won a County wide art Contest at 11 and at the comprehensive school it was always expected that I would go to Art College. 

When I was 14, I remember one of the weekly career films we were subjected to,but this one was different, it was on theBritish Film Industry. It was all pretty stiff really,it showed rooms filled with draftsman wearing ties and v neck sweaters. But something about the creative aspect of it appealed to me. 

Disillusioned after 2 years at Art College I put my thoughts of any career on hold and wandered Europe in self discovery...

Back in London I applied for a opening at Selfridges for their spectacular on Alice in Wonderland for Christmas.They were promoting the film Alice in Wonderland  starring Fiona Fullerton and it meant working with Scenic Painter,Set Decorator and Artist Peter Hewitt RA. 

Peter had worked on the film itself and was a very highly respected Set Decorator and Artist in the Entertainment Industry.We were based in a studio in West Kensington London and the work was tremendously exciting and rewarding. At the same time Peter was doing a huge backing for the Tower of London for a celebration which involved the Queen which Peter let me assist him on.

After the work was over it left me wanting more. I didn’t know anybody in the industry except Peter and he encouraged me to apply to the Film Union.Those days the Union was a closed shop.I can remember them interviewing me and sitting there with my portfolio of work.Unbeknown to me, I had hit it at the right time because they were looking to encourage new people into the Industry. After some months of waiting, I got a call for a place on a TV show called Space1999 as the runner or as they called it then the Tea Boy.An entry level opportunity that had huge opportunities. I got the job and around the same time there were two others that started on projects as well which included Stanley Kubrick’s daughter.The three of us were the newest blood in the Industry for years.There was no film schools to go to then and no official apprenticeship program so this was brave new ground.We had to learn from people who we worked with and we had to make every opportunity count. I can remember being shown stop motion from the great Ray Harryhausen and how to draw a set for lighting, work with camera angles,projections,matts,miniatures,blue screen,foreground miniatures and false perspective from so many other masters of their fields.

I was fortunate, I was assigned to the Set Decorator Mike Ford who went on to win oscars for Star Wars, Indiana Jones and Titanic and later the industry recognized Master Draftsman of Europe Reginald Bream who had worked on the original Moby Dick and Cleopatra. I studied Architecture and it’s History and Construction with him for 10 years and loved every moment of it. He was a genius at his work.We worked with everybody from Spielberg, George Lucas,Michael Cimino, Stanley Kubrick,Robert Zimeckis, Dick Lester, Jim HensontoFranco Zeferelli.—on some of the most dynamic and memorablefilms of this and past generations—Princess Bride, Roger Rabbit,Batman, James Bond, Labyrinth, Indiana Jones, Superman, Last of the Mohicans,Dark Crystal, and many many more. 

Before I moved to America,one of my greatest influences was working with the Great Elliot Scott.To be a part of his team was something very special and envied.His team was small but included some of the best people out there.His biggest influence was the old German school of Art Directors and he used to build his sets in a series of layers so when you looked thru the camera it all lined up into one image, a little like photoshop today. Layers were so important and you could force them to create false perspectives. It used to terrify Directors, but once they tried it once they were hooked. Now it’s all done by VFX. But thats increasingly getting cost prohibitive so it may all come back again.

All of these influences are shown and reflected in my artwork.I believe I could not do anything I am doing now without the influences of this past.

My art today uses perspective,computer compositing and skill-based production design techniques like draftsmanship, drawing, and painting learned in the European tradition of apprenticeship training when I started in the film industry. The work begins with freehand drawing that utilizes several techniques.The cut outs in the work derive from the use of perspective I used in films like Indiana Jones, Labyrinth and Roger Rabbit. The colors used in the artworks are purposefully muted to telegraph America’s iconic images and places rooted in the past. Influences from past entertainment venues, such as the Circus and Fairgrounds, are present along with my love for Americana.The layering effects in each work tell the deeper story beyond the iconic recognition.The curtain opens and the stage is set.

As a film production designer and artist I see the big picture story or theme of a project and then break it down into its parts—in film it is sets with walls; in my art it is paintings within frames. They say every good film starts with a good script.  In my artwork, my primary source material is the background of history and the contribution it makes to the times we live in today. As a European, I am steeped in history, and I bring that to my work to play out today in a very American way.